#35 Jim Boeheim
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6'3"   Guard / Coach
HS: Lyons Central Lyons, NY
Born: 11/17/1944 Lyons, NY
Season Stats
Season Cl Pos G GS FG FGA % FT FTA % Asst Reb Fls DQ Pts PPG APG RPG
1963-64 So G 25 1 50 105 47.6% 31 38 81.6% - 41 - - 131
5.2
---
1.6
1964-65 Jr G 23 0 91 194 46.9% 23 39 59.0% - 58 - - 205
8.9
---
2.5
1965-66 Sr G 28 28 179 317 56.5% 51 74 68.9% 88 78 48 1 409
14.6
3.1
2.8
Career    
76
29
320
616
51.9%
105
151
69.5%
88
177
+48
+1
745
9.8
1.2
2.3
               
Season
Wins
Losses
Pct
Notes Big East
ACC
1976-1977
26
4
.867
NCAA 2nd Round    
1977-1978
22
6
.786
NCAA 1st Round
 
 
1978-1979
26
4
.867
NCAA Sweet Sixteen
 
 
1979-1980
26
4
.867
NCAA Sweet Sixteen
5-1
 
1980-1981
22
12
.647
NIT Tournament Finals; Big East Champion
6-8
 
1981-1982
16
13
.552
NIT Tournament
7-7
 
1982-1983
21
10
.677
NCAA 2nd Round
9-7
 
1983-1984
23
9
.719
NCAA Sweet Sixteen
12-4
 
1984-1985
22
9
.710
NCAA 2nd Round
9-7
 
1985-1986
26
6
.813
NCAA 2nd Round
14-2
 
1986-1987
31
7
.816
NCAA National Champion Runner Up; Final Four
12-4
 
1987-1988
26
9
.743
NCAA Sweet Sixteen; Big East Champion
11-5
 
1988-1989
30
8
.789
NCAA Elite Eight
10-6
 
1989-1990
26
7
.818
NCAA Sweet Sixteen
12-4
 
1990-1991
26
6
.813
NCAA 1st Round
12-4
 
1991-1992
22
10
.688
NCAA 2nd Round; Big East Champion
10-8
 
1992-1993
20
9
.690
Banned from Post Season Activity
10-8
 
1993-1994
23
7
.767
NCAA Sweet Sixteen
13-5
 
1994-1995
20
10
.667
NCAA 2nd Round
12-6
 
1995-1996
29
9
.763
NCAA National Champion Runner Up; Final Four
12-6
 
1996-1997
19
13
.594
NIT 1st Round
9-9
 
1997-1998
26
9
.743
NCAA Sweet Sixteen
12-6
 
1998-1999
21
12
.636
NCAA 1st Round
10-8
 
1999-2000
26
6
.813
NCAA Sweet Sixteen
13-3
 
2000-2001
25
9
.735
NCAA 2nd Round
10-6
 
2001-2002
23
13
.639
NIT Final Four
9-7
 
2002-2003
30
5
.857
NCAA National Championship; Final Four
13-3
 
2003-2004
23
8
.742
NCAA Sweet Sixteen
11-5
 
2004-2005
27
7
.794
NCAA 1st Round; Big East Champion
11-5
 
2005-2006
23
12
.656
NCAA 1st Round; Big East Champion
7-9
 
2006-2007
24
11
.686
NIT Quarter Finals
10-6
 
2007-2008
21
14
.600
NIT Quarter Finals
9-9
 
2008-2009
28
10
.737
NCAA Sweet Sixteen
11-7
 
2009-2010
30
5
.857
NCAA Sweet Sixteen; Big East Season Champions
15-3
 
2010-2011
27
8
.771

NCAA 2nd Round

12-6
 
2011-2012
34
3
.919
NCAA Elite Eight; Big East Season Champions
17-1
 
2012-2013
30
10
.750
NCAA Final Four
11-7
 
2013-2014
28
6
.824
NCAA Round of 32
14-4
38 years
948
320
.748
1 National Championship, 4 Final Four, 31 NCAA, 6 NIT
366-192
14-4

His roommate and teammate Dave Bing was Syracuse's greatest basketball player ever; Jim Boeheim IS Syracuse basketball, having been associated with the program for over 45 years as a player, assistant coach, and head coach.

Jim Boeheim - CoachJim Boeheim was a skinny walk-on in 1963, who impressed coach Fred Lewis with his determination and earned a place on the squad. By time his junior year rolled around he had earned a scholarship and a starting position in the lineup, sharing the backcourt with the legendary Bing. During his senior year he averaged 14.6 points, and helped the team reach the Elite Eight of the NCAA tournament.

Upon graduation, he played minor league basketball for a few seasons with Scranton in the Eastern Basketball League. He helped lead the team to league championships in 1970 and 1972, before returning to Syracuse as a graduate assistant basketball coach under Roy Danforth. At the same time he was the varsity golf coach, a sport that Boeheim excelled at (he lettered in golf at Syracuse in 1964 and 1965).

In 1972 he became an assistant coach under Danforth, and remained in that position through 1976. Syracuse made their first trip to the NCAA Final Four in 1975, while Boeheim was an assistant.

Roy Danforth stepped down at the end of 1976, and Boeheim landed his dream job, as head coach of the Syracuse Jim Boeheim - PlayerOrangemen. During his first four years, the team would go 100-18 (winning 85% of his games). Boeheim had one successful team after another, winning 20 games a year like clockwork, yet had earned a reputation as "not being able to win the big games".

In 1987, that reputation changed as he took a young team to the NCAA Championship game, losing to Bobby Knight's Indiana Hoosiers on a last minute shot by Keith Smart. In 1996, he once again took an underrated team, led by John Wallace, to the NCAA Finals, losing to highly favored Rick Pitino's Kentucky Wildcats in a close game.

2003 would change everything, as the Orangemen, behind the irrepressible Carmelo Anthony, the sharp shooting of Gerry McNamara, and 'the Block' by Hakim Warrick, would beat Roy William's Kansas for Syracuse to win its first NCAA Tournament Championship.

In 2010 and 2012 Syracuse was considered a favorite to go to the Final Four, but costly injuries derailed those hopes. 2013 had different expectations as the team struggled to find an offensive identity, but demonstrated an outstanding zone defense. Boeheim would make his fourth Final Four as a head coach that year behind a zone defense that was the talk of the media. Michael Carter-Williams, C.J. Fair, Brandon Triche and James Southerland led the way to the Final Four where Syracuse would lose to a talented Michigan team.

Boeheim was never a media darling, often with sharp tongued whiplashings for reporters he thought asked stupid questions. He had a demeanor on the court as being whiny. But he was well respected by his peers, and was competitive as any player or coach on the court. A survivor of prostate cancer, he was actively involved with fund raising in the Coaches vs. Cancer Foundation.

His teams traditionally played a strong matchup zone, unique during most of his coaching tenure. As a result he tended to favor lanky players as opposed to the bulkier players other teams had. When his personnel dictated, he did use different defensive schemes, such as a pressure trap defense, used well during the late 80's.

Offensively, his teams ran very few set plays. Boeheim preferred to have the point guard break down the defense of the other team, and have his players work to get open for shots. In the 70's and 80's his teams ran a fast break offense, making them one of the highest scoring teams in the country; from the mid 90's on, the teams tended to settle more into half court sets. Regardless on how he ran the teams, they always seem to win.

Syracuse was 52-24 when he was a player, 139-65 as an assistant coach, and he's still working on that head coaching resume. He has been involved with all five Syracuse Final Four teams. He was the only coach for Syracuse in Big East play, winning more games than any other coach in Big East history with 366.

Syracuse named the basketball court at the Carrier Dome after Jim Boeheim. He is the winningest coach in Syracuse history, the winningest coach in Big East basketball history, and one of the winningest coaches in NCAA Basketball history. He was named the Big East Coach of the Year four times. He was inducted into the College Basketball Hall of Fame in 2005 and the Syracuse Sports Hall of Fame in 1989. Boeheim was an assistant coach on the 2008 United States Olympic team that won the Gold medal. He would have his 3lst 20-win season in 2010, an NCAA record for men's basketball. In 2010, after Syracuse had an improbable 30-5 season, he was named the USBWA, AP, and Naismith Coach of the Year.

Boeheim would become the third coach to ever win 900 games on December 17th, 2012, when Syracuse beat Detroit 72-68 at the Carrier Dome.

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