#34 Jeremy McNeil
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6'8" 257 lb Center
HS: Sam Houston San Antonio, TX
Born: 3/11/1980 Los Angeles, CA
Season Stats
Season Cl Pos G GS Min FG FGA % FT FTA % 3Pt 3PA % Asst Reb DReb OReb Fls DQ TO ST BS Pts PPG APG RPG
1999-00 Fr
C
6 0 40 3 5 60.0% 3 5 60.0% 0 0
---
0 13 8 5 11 1 5 1 6 9 1.5 0.0 2.2
2000-01 Fr
C
34 21 542 32 49 65.3% 21 37 56.8% 0 0
---
4 107 69 38 103 10 26 11 64 85 2.5 0.1 3.2
2001-02
So
C
30
0
441
46
67
68.7%
9
25
36.0%
0
0
---
3
112
72
40
84
3
23
14
45
101
3.4
0.1
3.7
2002-03
So
C
35
0
657
54
81
66.7%
9
20
45.0%
0
0
---
8
146
84
62
112
4
36
9
100
117
3.3
0.2
4.2
2003-04 Sr
C
30
0
396
37
49
75.5%
15
29
51.7%
0
0
---
2
82
43
39
73
2
19
9
45
89
3.0
0.1
2.7
Career    
135
21
2076
172
251
68.5%
57
116
49.1%
0
0
---
17
460
276
184
383
20
109
44
260
401
3.0
0.1
3.4

Jeremy McNeil was a terrific shot blocking center for Syracuse, with strong athletic ability. Offensively, he was very limited with his primary shot being the dunk. He knew his limitation on the offense however, and as a result of mostly dunking, had a very high shooting percentage. He was not a good ball handler, and a very poor free throw shooter (fortunately, he had very limited opportunities).

McNeil severely injured his knee six games into his freshman season. The NCAA granted him a medical redshirt for that season, and as a result he would have four more years at Syracuse.

As a freshman, he became a starter about a third of the way through the season replacing senior Billy Celluck. Despite starting that year, he could only manage 15 minutes of playing time per game as he was constantly hampered by fouls.

McNeil would lose his starting job his sophomore season to freshman Craig Forth. While McNeil was more athletic and a better shot blocker, Forth played stronger defense and was a better offensive player. McNeil tended to try go get a block on every opponent's shot, often leaving his defensive position. This put holes in the Syracuse zone defense, created high foul totals for McNeil, and often put him in a position where he could not get the critical rebound.

Coach Boeheim would use McNeil as a reserve his last three seasons, in a vital backup role. McNeil would give Forth a rest; more importantly, when Syracuse would shift to a man-on-man or full court press defense, McNeil would often be inserted as the shot blocker, the 'last defense' on the press. In this role he was extremely valuable in the 2003 Championship season.

© RLYoung 2005